The Truth Continues: Solution vs. Suspension and How That Affects Greska’s Carbon-60

The Truth Continues: Solution vs. Suspension and How That Affects Greska’s Carbon-60

As we have stated every week, the continued support of our loyal customers has been truly inspiring. We are so grateful for not only your support, but your positive feedback, and your patience as well. This journey has taken us many months of testing and research, and we are excited to share the results with you.

As we continue our series on the truth about Greska’s Carbon-60 Organic Sunflower Oil, we’d like to share the third installment in a series of blogs which will help prove the integrity of Greska’s Carbon-60 Organic Sunflower Oil. Specifically, this week we will address why our C60 oil is black.

In our first article in this series: The Truth Starts Here, we reviewed a research study that was funded by the US Navy and conducted by researchers at the University of South Carolina. This study looked at what happened when C60 was mixed with different solvents. The results confirmed C60 when mixed in toxic solvents such as toluene, benzene and xylene, that the solution does indeed turn purple or magenta.

In our last report, we told you about a study conducted by researchers at the prestigious St. Petersburg State University in St. Petersburg, Russia. The study looked at C60 and how it reacted in various oils. After extensive study, researchers determined that C60 produced with toxic solvents—as most commercially available raw C60 powders are—inevitably contains remnants of those toxic solvents. The study also determined that the true color of pure C60 in vegetable oil is transparent or clear.

Bob Greska, Founder and CEO of Greska’s Carbon-60 Organic Sunflower Oil says,

“We pack a lot of Carbon 60 into our product. There’re two methods of getting the Carbon 60 into the oil. One is dissolving the carbon 60 into solution, showing clear.  The other method is suspending the carbon 60 as a colloidal suspension, showing black.

The carbon 60 molecule is so small, it’s atomic size, it goes into what we call a colloidal suspension.  The are so small that it suspends in the oil for a very long time.

As we add more Carbon-60 into suspension, we’re able to put quite a bit of Carbon-60 into our product. We end up with a highly concentrated, black, black, black color which our product is known for.”

In this installment we will walk you through the steps that led us to the conclusion that Greska’s Carbon-60 Organic Sunflower Oil, does contain C60, both in solution and in colloidal suspension.

Internet Demonstration:  Why did Greskas Carbon-60 Organic Sunflower Oil show clear?

greska's-c60-clear-solution

YouTube Video Challenging the Integrity of Greska’s C-60 Product

There is a YouTube video which shows Greska’s Carbon-60 Organic Sunflower Oil being filtered through a .2 micron filter. To fully understand the process in the video and why it is misleading, let’s look at what a .2 micron filter is and how it works. We will show why most of the C60 did not go through the filter in our next blog and video.

 What is a Micron?

A micron is defined as a unit of measure in the metric system. It is equal to 1 millionth of a meter in length (about 39 millionths of an inch). As a comparison, the typical cross-section of a human hair is about 100 microns. The human eye cannot typically see anything smaller than 40 microns in size.

What is a Nanometer?

A nanometer is defined as a unit of measure in the metric system. It is equal to 1 billionth of a meter in length (about 39 billionths of an inch). A C60 molecule is reported to be about 1 nanometer. So, you can see that a .2 micron filter will not filter out individual C60 molecules, so the C60 will pass right through a .2 micron or .22 micron filter.

Why Use a .2 (or .22) Micron Filter?

While we don’t know the exact reason, this YouTuber chose to use this particular size filter, we can share with you some information about this filter and what it’s typically used for. The .2 micron or the .22 micron designation refers to the relative pore size of the filter. Particles larger than .2 microns or .22 microns will not pass through the filter and particles smaller than .2 microns or .22 microns will pass through the filter. In other biological and laboratory applications, membrane filters must have a nominal pore size of 0.22 microns or less if they are to be used for sterilization. This size filter is typically used for filtering out bacteria or other pathogens. Membrane filters are available in a wide range of pore sizes from 0.11 microns to 10 microns for biological and laboratory uses.

This YouTuber said he used a .2 micron filter from VWR, similar to the filter pictured in this photo.

.2-micron-filter

VWR .2 Micron Filter

In summary: .2 micron / .22 micron

There is very little difference between a .2 micron and a .22 micron filter. Therefore, we will use the .22 micron filter for all of our tests so to match the micron filter size competitors use on their product.

Step Three:  Dissolved Solutions, Suspensions and Colloidal Suspensions Explanations

As we saw in the YouTube video, a black solution is drawn into the syringe, the filter is then attached to the end of a syringe, then the solution is pushed through the .2 micron filter showing clear.

So why did the dissolved solution look clear in this video? If you remember from last week’s article the Russian scientist, Dr. Semenov, states in his research, “Fullerenes and natural vegetable oils form absolutely transparent true solutions stable in time”.

So why does Greska’s Carbon-60 Organic Sunflower Oil look black straight out of the bottle? That’s because Greska’s Carbon 60 Organic Sunflower Oil is both a dissolved solution and a colloidal suspension of Carbon 60. How did we come to that conclusion?

First, let’s learn more about the differences between a dissolved solution, a suspension and a colloidal suspension.

What is a Solution?

  • A dissolved solution is a mixture of molecules
  • Dissolved solutions are transparent or clear, meaning you can see through them.
  • Dissolved solutions have a particle size about .1 to 2 nanometers (nm)
  • Gravity has no effect on molecules in a dissolved solution

What is a Suspension?

  • A suspension has bigger particle/molecule sizes larger than about 1,000 nanometers (nm)
  • Suspensions may look cloudy or murky
  • Particles/molecules in suspensions settle out after time due to gravity

What is a Colloidal Suspension?

  • A colloidal suspension (or dispersion) is a solution and a suspension
  • A colloidal suspension contains particle sizes between about 1 to 100 nanometers (nm)
  • They are evenly distributed throughout the liquid and don’t typically settle out
  • Some colloidal suspensions include: milk, shampoo, orange juice and paint
  • Some colloidal suspensions need to be mixed or stirred after prolonged periods where the particles begin to settle at the bottom due to gravity, for example: orange juice or paint, even our product after about a year will show evidence of the colloidal suspension settling
  • BUT, researchers believe that “…the C60 molecule could be considered as a colloidal particle itself due the fact that it’s diameter equals to 10 Å”(1 nanometer).

Angstrom (Å), unit of length used chiefly in measuring wavelengths of light, equal to 10−10 metre, or 0.1 nanometer. It is named for the 19th-century Swedish physicist Anders Jonas Ångström. 10Å equals 1 nanometer

c60-molecule-is-a-colloid

C60 Molecule is a Colloid

“Because we have C60 in a Solution and an abundance in a colloidal suspension, I believe this is what makes our product work so well.” said CEO Bob Greska.

Here is a test you can do at home to see whether something is a solution or a suspension. As we know, salt looks like white crystals. But, when you stir salt into a glass of water the salt becomes transparent as it goes into solution. If you keep adding salt to the glass of water, at a certain point, you will over-saturate the glass with salt. The excess salt will no longer dissolve into solution and start to collect at the bottom of the glass. Now if you stir the glass, the liquid will temporarily become a cloudy white color. After a short amount of time, the excess salt in suspension will again collect at the bottom. The salt in solution will again show clear.

 

So how did we determine we have both a solution and a colloidal suspension?

NASA Science: The Physics of Orange Juice

First, the Russian study confirmed the YouTuber’s test results when Greska’s Carbon-60 Organic Sunflower Oil came through the filter clear, “Fullerenes and natural vegetable oils form absolutely transparent true solutions stable in time.”

According to an article by NASA, some colloidal suspensions need to be mixed or stirred after prolonged periods where the denser particles begin to settle at the bottom due to gravity. For example: orange juice and paint, even our product after about a year will show evidence of the colloidal suspension settling. To get the C60 back into colloidal suspension give the bottle a good shake for about 30 seconds.

 

 

 

 

 

Watch this video as Bob Greska demonstrates dissolved solution and colloidal suspension

 

But, we needed to further explore this in our own testing. So, here’s what we did:  We took 21 small bottles and filled them with approximately one teaspoon of our organic sunflower oil. We then added our raw C-60 powder to the first bottle of our organic sunflower oil and the solution remained clear. In the second bottle we added an additional incremental amount of our raw C-60 powder, this also remained clear. We kept adding incremental amounts to the following bottles. As one would imagine, the first bottle was transparent. The second bottle was also transparent. By bottle No. 5, the mixture began to turn dark. By bottle No. 21 we had reached our full concentration of our product.  The mixture was the familiar black color that Greska’s Carbon-60 Organic Sunflower Oil’s loyal customers have come to expect.

c60-sunflower-oil-demonstration

C60 Sunflower Oil Demonstration

Now back to that YouTube video we referenced at the beginning of this article. In the video, our product, Greska’s Carbon-60 Organic Sunflower Oil is loaded into a syringe with a .2 or .22 micron filter on the end. The size of the filter is not clear to us, as the YouTuber refers to the filter as a .2 micron filter. The video references a .2 micron filter however, in the blog posted on his website, they refer to a .22 micron filter. But the link takes you a link on eBay that is a .2 filter.

.2-micron-filter-ad

ebay .2 Micron Filter Ad

Nonetheless, the size of the filter is probably a moot point as the difference between the .2 and .22 filter is negligible. The solution is then pushed through the .2 or .22 micron filter into a test tube. Drops begin to emerge into the test tube. And, when the “experiment” is finished, only a clear liquid emerged from the filter. And remember from our last blog, the Russian study, states that pure C60 is, “absolutely transparent true solutions stable in time” and in addition “…the C60 molecule could be considered as a colloidal particle itself” due to the fact that a carbon 60 molecule is one nanometer or smaller in size.

 

 

Another question that might come up—can C60 in oil be both a solution and a colloidal suspension? We would answer YES! Some examples of a substance being both a solution and a suspension at the same time are:

  • Sand suspended in salt water
  • Homemade lemonade (simple sugar syrup mixed with lemon juice)
  • Blood (a solution, a suspension and a colloidal suspension)

Remember…some colloidal suspensions need to be mixed or stirred after prolonged periods where the particles begin to settle at the bottom due to gravity, for example: orange juice and paint, even our product after about a year will show evidence of the colloidal suspension settling

What Have We Learned in this blog? Let’s all agree:

  • YouTube videos can be misleading. It’s important that you do your own research to understand the truth
  • Greska’s Carbon-60 Organic Sunflower Oil is both a solution and a colloidal suspension
  • The C60 molecule is considered a colloid
  • We now understand the difference between a solution and a colloidal Suspension
  • A substance can be a solution and a colloidal suspension at the same time

 

 

So, the next big questions is:  What is the black residue left in the filter?

Well, we have the answer to that question in next week’s blog, where we will discuss polar and non-polar solvents. But, here’s a hint…think about colloidal suspensions. Stay tuned!

 

4 Comments

  • Andrew Posted October 28, 2018 4:25 pm

    Just an observation, but IF you were crooks, you would probably make your product look the same as every other product. What kind of crook would make themselves look conspicuously different from everyone else?

    • C60ShopManager Posted November 30, 2018 3:31 pm

      Hi Andrew. Good observation! I am sure if you try Greska’s Carbon-60 you will be convinced like many others it works the best, tastes the best and is affordable. Bob Greska

  • paul Posted November 29, 2018 1:04 pm

    would like to order c60 powder

    • C60ShopManager Posted November 30, 2018 3:17 pm

      Hi Paul, We do not sell the C60 powder by itself. It requires special procedures to mix it into the oil. We will soon have available a Commercial C60 concentrate in sunflower oil that you can add to any oil of your choice. Just take our 2 ounce bottle add to 30 ounces, stir it or shake it and done. You will have your 1 to 2 teaspoon serving C60 oil. Call me if you want to pre order the Commercial concentrate. We will also offer it in 16 ounce bottles to make 2 gallons for manufacturers / resellers.

      Bob Greska
      303-521-4001

Add Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.